How to use qcow2 Image on Virtualbox

This is an article written to display or to present about how to use qcow2 image file on Virtualbox. Basically, qcow2 image as far as I know it cannot be used directly to be started or to be booted when the qcow2 image itself is basically an operating system image. To be able to use it, first of all, the qcow2 image needs to be converted. Virtualbox can start or can boot image in the vdi file format. In order for a qcow2 file image can be utilized in the Virtualbox, these steps below must be executed properly :

1. Convert the qcow2 file image. Below is how to convert the file before it can be used in Virtualbox :

qemu-img convert -f qcow2 qcow2_file_name -O vdi vdi_file_name

The command pattern above which is used to convert file image from qcow2 format into vdi format can be executed in a real situation as follows :

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How to Solve Error Message “laravel.log” could not be opened: failed to open stream: Permission denied

This is an article written where the laravel.log file could not be opened because of the failure to open the stream since it is denied because of the permission. The stream which is mentioned cannot be opened is the stream for creating a new file. The file is a laravel.log file which is created by default in the following directory of laravel root folder directory shown in the tree format :

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How to Change Directory Permissions in Linux Recursively

As shown in the title of this article, this article is written to describe or to show how to change directory permissions in Linux operating system recursively. In order to do that, an effective way to achieve it is by using an appropriate command executed. The command itself usually executed in a command line interface or a CLI-like utility such as terminal.

In the terminal, there will be a bash-prompt provided or a shell bash-prompt available to execute the command for changing directory permissions in linux recursively. Depends on the user logged-in, usually a normal user can have a default shell-bash prompt for executing command.

So, in order to change the permission of a folder, below is the command pattern :

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How to Solve Error Message fatal: Dirty repository: Having uncommitted changes. Exiting… upon executing git ftp push

This is an error generated upon executing a command of ‘git ftp push’ or ‘git-ftp push’. The command itself is actually a command executed in a CLI-environment or in a Command Line Interface terminal. The command itself is intended to push files and even folders to a Git-based repository such as Gitlab, Gitblit or any other Git-based repository tools.

Based on the manual page, it can be fathomed that it is a Git tool powered by FTP client. This tool is used to push the changes of files or folders in the Git local repository to a Git remote repository which is accessed through an FTP utility. The error can be shown as follows :

user@hostname:~/source-code$ git ftp push
fatal: Dirty repository: Having uncommitted changes. Exiting...
user@hostname:~/source-code$

But before finally pushing the files or folders to a Git-based repository, there are several steps taken before which is shown as follows :

1. Add the modified files or folders in the local Git-based repository.

user@hostname:~/source-code$ git add *

The command above is executed to add modified files or folders’s content to an index in order to be staged for further commit.

2. Commit all the modified files or folders which has already been added in the index of staging phase for further commit. Below is the execution command :

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How to Check Operating System Name and Version in Linux

This article is written to show how to do the thing specified in the title of this article. It is about how to check operating system name and also the version of it. In order to achieve the purpose or the goal, the exact or the suitable command is needed to be performed. It is actually a command performed in any terminal or any tool which is considered as text or command line interface. Any host, workstation or server which is running in a GUI (Graphical User Interface) or in a CLI (Command Line Interface) doesn’t matter at all. As long as the operating system has any command line interface in order execute a command for printing or showing the operating system name. Below is the command :

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How to Check Physical Memory in Linux

This article specifically written for showing on how to check the physical memory of an operating system which in this context, it is the physical memory of a Linux operating system. Using specific command, the amount of size possessed which is describing the total size of physical memory can be revealed. To be able to show the memory size of the physical memory attached in the server, host or workstation, it can be achieved by executing command available in the operating system :

1. cat /proc/meminfo

It is actually a command to display the content of the file named meminfo located in /proc.

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How to Check hard disk Size in Linux

This article where the title is ‘How to Check hard disk Size in Linux’, as described in the title, it is an article which is written to show how to check the hard disk size in Linux operating system. It is utilizing a certain command available in the Linux operating system. The command is executed in the bash shell prompt. So, to be able to perform the command, either the operating system runs in GUI (Graphical User Interface) or in CLI (Command Line Interface), a terminal or any command line interface is needed.

Those commands are shown as follows :

1. lsblk

user@hostname:~$ lsblk
NAME   MAJ:MIN RM   SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT
sda      8:0    0 238,5G  0 disk 
├─sda1   8:1    0   512M  0 part /boot/efi
├─sda2   8:2    0 230,1G  0 part /
└─sda3   8:3    0   7,9G  0 part [SWAP]
user@hostname:~$

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